A High-Resolution Timer for Win32

2 minute read

This post lists the code for creating a high resolution timer for the Microsoft Windows platform. High resolution timers are often used in multimedia and entertainment applications for timing events up to the microsecond.

This is a heavily modified re-post of the article that used to be on the Scriptionary.com website before the change to the blog, read the source code for details.

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WebGL: OpenGL ES 2.0 for the Web

2 minute read

As an OpenGL junkie I just have to dedicate at least one post to this topic.

By now you’ve undoubtedly heard of OpenGL ES, the OpenGL based library used on embedded devices such as cell phones and gaming consoles. OpenGL ES is what gives many Android based phones and iPhones their 3D gaming capabilities that rival the desktop machines of only a few years ago in terms of power. It seems like these days we’re all carrying a little computer in our pocket.

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Counting Processor Cores and Threads

5 minute read

Here’s a little snippet I’d like to share with you since there really isn’t a good example online that shows you how to count the processor cores and threads on Microsoft Windows using the Windows API through C++.

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First Public Larrabee Demo

less than 1 minute read

Intel demoed Larrabee for the first time to the public at the IDF (Intel Developer Forum), according to PC Pro.

The attached screenshot is a bit underwhelming but maybe we’ll see some impressive examples soon. In any case, if the demo is at the IDF now, the public release couldn’t be far off.

Edit (2010)

In case you haven’t heard — it seems like Larrabee was cancelled for good.

DirectX Developer Blog

less than 1 minute read

Apparently, the DirectX team has had a blog since late April of this year it’s just not very popular I guess.

They’ve posted a shipload of information over the last couple of months, so if you’re like me and had no idea this existed, you’ll have quite some reading to catch up to. It’s mostly about Windows 7 and the new graphics APIs (Direct2D, DirectWrite, etc.) but it’s interesting nonetheless.